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A key action point from the WIMBIZ Town Hall Meeting was for NGOs, CSOs and communities at large to keep the conversation going about the Chibok situation and the girl child in Nigeria.
Over 6 weeks later, the kidnapped Chibok girls are still missing but international news outlets have kept the abduction at the top of their news agendas.  Key international figures, including the First Lady of the United States Michelle Obama, P. Diddy and Mary J. Blige have also joined in on raising awareness through the #BringBackOurGirls campaign.  The campaign has led to government action in Nigeria with help from the US, UK and France.
However as the girls have still not been found, NGOs, CSOs and communities must ensure that the world does not stop talking about it until every single child has been safely returned.  Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and all the other social media platforms have been great sources of information and have significantly increased campaign awareness.  NGOs, CSOs and communities must continue to post regularly about the kidnapping so that the government remains active in trying to locate the missing schoolgirls and the world doesn’t forget.
There are a variety of ways to keep the conversation going:   
  • Ask a question – post questions about the topic using #BringBackOurGirls to prompt your social followers to engage with you about the topic.
  • Share information – post relevant, up-to-date information about the topic using #BringBackOurGirls, which your followers may repost to their followers.  You can also repost information the people you follow post to share with your followers.

Are there any other ways to keep the conversation going?  Or do you know of any other avenues that will effectively raise awareness?  Please leave a comment below for suggestions of practical solutions that NGOs, CSOs and communities can apply to address the challenges facing the girl child and her family in the crisis areas.

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